Histamine Molecular Structure

Histamine Molecular Structure

This week's molecule will be Histamine

Histamine is a chemical compound released in the body during allergic reactions. It is therefore the culprit of your recurrent sneezing, itching, flushing, and worse, it may also cause difficulty in breathing if present in higher levels. But despite this undesirable effects, why is it still produced? Let’s find out.

Why does the body secrete Histamine?

Whenever our body encounters a pathogen or foreign substance, the white blood cells (which are the ‘soldiers’ against pathogens) comes to rescue. Histamine allows the white blood cells and the other chemical defenses to easily enter the blood vessels and go to their respective targets. Increased permeability of blood vessels leads to the escape of fluids from the blood vessels to tissues leading to the usual symptoms of allergic reactions such as watery eyes and runny nose.

How does Histamine look in Chemistry?

Histamine Molecular Model
Histamine Molecular Structure

Let’s Get Building!

Using your Student Molecular Model Set from Duluth Labs let’s create Histamine! You’ll need:

  • 5 Carbon atoms

  • 3 Nitrogen Atom

  • 9 Hydrogens

  • 9 Small connectors (compact small bonds for hydrogen)

  • 6 Medium connectors (single covalent bonds)

  • 4 Long connectors

  • Molecular Tool (for Disassembly)

Put aside all the atoms and connectors needed.

Let’s begin with building our 5-membered imidazole ring.

Histamine Molecular Structure

Note: Imagine we’re building a house, and we start at the topmost part – the roof! We will build this part of the molecule in a clockwise direction. 

Steps

  • 1
    Histamine Molecular Model

    1. First, get one nitrogen atom, then attach one carbon (Carbon 4) to its right using a medium connector

  • 2
    Histamine Molecular Model

    2. Then using 2 long connectors, attach another carbon atom (Carbon 5) to Carbon 4 . Then using a short connector, attach a hydrogen atom on Carbon/p>

  • 3
    Histamine Molecular Model

    3. Attach a Nitrogen atom on Carbon 5 using a medium connector.

  • 4
    Histamine Molecular Model

    4. Again, attach one hydrogen atom to Nitrogen using a small connector.

  • 5
    Histamine Molecular Model

    5. Attach 1 carbon atom (Carbon 2) above nitrogen using a medium connector.

  • 6
    Histamine Molecular Model

    6. Use 1 small connector to attach 1 hydrogen atom on Carbon 2.

  • 7
    Histamine Molecular Model

    7. Using 2 long connectors and attach the nitrogen atom to Carbon 2.

Wonderful! We are now done with our 5-membered imidazole ring.

Histamine Molecular Model

Let’s now create the ethanamine chain attached to our ring.

  • 1
    Histamine Molecular Model

    1.Attach one carbon (Carbon 2’) to Carbon 4 of the imidazole ring using a medium connector.

  • 2
    Histamine Molecular Model

    2. Using 2 small connectors, attach 2 hydrogen atoms to Carbon 2’.

  • 3
    Histamine Molecular Model

    3. Using 1 medium connector, attach 1 carbon atom (Carbon 1’) to Carbon 2’. Then use 2 small connectors to attach 2 hydrogen atoms

  • 4
    Histamine Molecular Model

    4. Lastly, attach 1 Nitrogen atom to Carbon 1’ using a medium connector. The attach 2 hydrogen atoms to nitrogen using 2 small connectors

We want to know how you made Histamine!

How did your Histamine Molecule turn out?

Comment and share pictures below! Tune in next week for another molecule of the week!

See you then xoxo :)

Duluth Labs

Afton Direct LLC


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