Biotin

biotin

Biotin: Hair, Skin and Nails 

Biotin, also known as Vitamin B7 is a water soluble vitamin that is present in every living cell. Biotin is one of the vitamins which belongs to the commonly known Vitamin B complex family. These are necessary for healthy metabolism, nerve, and cardiovascular functions.

Biotin is also known to act as a coenzyme which is necessary for the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids, and glucose. Foods rich in biotin include meat, eggs, avocado, cauliflower, berries, fish, and legumes. Whenever we consume these foods that are rich in fats, proteins, and carbohydrates, biotin must be present to convert these macronutrients to energy.

The molecule is very much known for keeping us young and good looking. This is due to its ability to maintain the health of our hair, skin, and nails. It is often times included as a key ingredient in many hair, skin and nails supplement. It is a commonly sought after vitamin by women who suffer from hair loss/damage, dry and dull skin or brittle nails. So as a female, next time you decide to shop for supplements, keep biotin in mind.

What does Biotin look like in Chemistry?

biotin molecule

Let’s Get Building!

Using your Student Molecular Set from Duluth Labs let’s create Biotin! You’ll need:

  • 10 Carbon Atoms

  • 16 Hydrogen atoms

  • 2 Nitrogen Atoms

  • 3 Oxygen Atoms

  • 1 Sulfur Atom

  • 16Small connectors (compact small bonds for hydrogen)

  • 13 Medium Connectors

  • 4 Long connectors

  • Molecular Tool (for Disassembly)

Put aside all the atoms and connectors needed.

Let’s Start Building With Our Imidazole Ring.

biotin molecule

Note: We build this portion in a clockwise direction, starting with Carbon 1.

Let’s start!

Steps:

  • 1
    biotin molecule

    1. Get a Carbon atom (Carbon 1) then attach it to a nitrogen atom using a medium connector. Then using 2 long connectors and attach an oxygen atom to carbon 1.

  • 2
    biotin molecule

    2.Using a short connector, attach a hydrogen atom to the nitrogen atom.

  • 3
    biotin molecule

    3.Using a medium connector, attach the nitrogen atom to another carbon atom(Carbon 3).Then using a small connector, attach a hydrogen atom behind carbon 3.

  • 4
    biotin molecule

    4.Get a medium connector and attach Carbon 3 to Carbon 7. Then using a small connector, attach a hydrogen atom behind carbon 7.

  • 5
    biotin molecule

    5.Afterwards, use a medium connector to attach Carbon 7 to another nitrogen atom. The use a small connector, attach a hydrogen atom to this nitrogen atom.

     

  • 6
    biotin molecule

    6.Lastly, using a medium connector attach this nitrogen atom to back to Carbon 1.

  • biotin molecule

    Yay! We've just built our Imidazole Ring Portion!

Note: Let’s now build the Tetrahydrothiopene portion of our biotin molecule. We will build this portion in a clockwise direction, starting with the Sulfur atom.

biotin molecule

Let’s continue building!

Steps:

  • 1
    biotin molecule

    1.Get a sulfur atom and a medium connector, attach a carbon atom (Carbon 6)to the sulfur. Then using 2 small connectors, attach 2 hydrogen atoms to Carbon 6.

  • 2
    biotin molecule

    2.Use a medium connector to attach Carbon 6 to Carbon 7.

  • 3
    biotin molecule

    3.Then, using a medium connector and another carbon atom, attach Carbon 4 toCarbon 3 . Afterwards, use a small connector to attach a hydrogen atom to Carbon 4.

  • 4
    biotin molecule

    4.Finally, use a medium connector to attach the sulfur atom to Carbon 4.

  • Yay! We've just built our Tetrahydrothiophene Portion.

Finally Let’s add our Pentatonic Acid to the complex! We will me building this straight chain.

biotin molecule

Let’s continue building!

Steps:

  • 1
    biotin molecule

    1.Get a carbon atom (Carbon 1’)and a medium connector and attach this behindCarbon 4. Using 2 small connectors, attach 2 hydrogen atoms to Carbon 1’.

  • 2
    biotin molecule

    2.Then, get a medium connector and another carbon atom (Carbon 2’)and attach this to Carbon 1’. As above, using 2 small connectors to attach 2 hydrogen atoms to Carbon 2’.

  • 3
    biotin molecule

    3.Repeat Step #2 above for Carbon 3’ and Carbon 4’.

  • 4
    biotin molecule

    4.Using a medium connector, attach the final carbon to carbon 4’. Then using 2 long connectors, attach an oxygen atom to the final carbon.

  • 5
    biotin molecule

    5.On the remaining hole of the last carbon, use a medium connector and attach another oxygen atom. Then finally, use a small connector to attach a hydrogen atom to the oxygen atom.

Great work! Now we have our newly-built Biotin Molecule!

Feel free to show us how your Biotin turned out!


Comment and share pictures below!

Tune in next week for another Molecule of the week!

See you then xoxo :)

Duluth Labs

Afton Direct LLC


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